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Cherry Hill, Gloucester Twp. & Camden County Police Depts. Awarded Grants to Encourage Use of Stationhouse Adjustments for Youth

New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal and the Juvenile Justice Commission (“JJC”) announced on September 17, 2020 that the Governor’s Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (“JJDP”) Committee has awarded six grants totaling more than $200,000 to local police departments and community-based organizations to encourage the use of stationhouse adjustments for youth who have contact with the local police.

The funding was made available to jurisdictions with high instances of juvenile arrests, particularly among youth of color, as a strategy for reducing racial disparities in the formal juvenile justice system.

Stationhouse adjustments allow police officers to divert youth accused of committing minor offenses, such as ordinance violations, disorderly persons offenses, and fourth degree offenses, from formal court proceedings. Stationhouse adjustments allow these minor delinquency matters to be resolved locally and outside of a court room, providing an opportunity to address root causes of behavior, impose immediate consequences, and offer supports to youth, which can include referrals to social service agencies, community service projects, financial restitution, mediation, letters of apology, or writing assignments. Parents, guardians, or caregivers and any known victims must agree to the stationhouse adjustment process.

“New Jersey has become a national model for reducing reliance on incarceration and other out of home placements among youth with minimal involvement in the juvenile justice system, but there is more to do,” said Gurbir S. Grewal, Attorney General.“Stationhouse adjustments allow local law enforcement and community members to encourage conversations and develop relationships with young people. These are the tools we will use to successfully build stronger communities and reduce the number of young people who are treated too harshly for minor infractions, many of whom are youth of color.”

“Years of research proves that the long-term success of young people increases dramatically if we can prevent them from formally entering the juvenile justice system. Behavioral change is more likely if young people are provided with immediate constructive consequences for their decisions, coupled with community-based supports,” said Jennifer LeBaron, Ph.D., Acting Executive Director of the Juvenile Justice Commission. “Through this funding, communities can prevent youth from progressing further into the juvenile justice system and address the overrepresentation of youth of color in the formal system. Stationhouse adjustments are an important resource that should be available in every New Jersey community.”

Based on the philosophy that communities have a unique understanding of their local youth populations, the JJC administers several funding initiatives and state-level services that encourage the development and enhancement of a continuum of community-based services and sanctions, from prevention programs to sentencing options for at-risk, court-involved, and delinquent youth.

One such funding program is the federal Title II grant, which New Jersey receives for participating in the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act. As part of the Act, participating states are required to have a governor-appointed committee comprised of juvenile justice professionals, community leaders, and individuals who have been involved with the juvenile justice system that oversees the state’s compliance with the Act and that makes decisions regarding the allocation of Title II grant funds. In New Jersey, this JJDP Committee funds both state- and local-level initiatives, community-based programs, and system reform efforts, including the Stationhouse Adjustment Support Initiative.

This competitive funding opportunity was made available to local police departments and non-profit and for-profit organizations serving municipalities with high levels of arrests and referrals to court, particularly among youth of color, based on data included in the 2017 New Jersey Uniform Crime Report. Programs funded through the project will run from June 1, 2020 – May 31, 2021.Up to $50,000 was available to each grantee for reimbursement of program costs to provide immediate, short-term sanctions and services for low-level youthful offenders. Many of the projects that received funding involve partnerships between police departments and community-based organizations to strengthen the level of support given to youth participating in the programs.

“The JJDP Committee awards approximately one million dollars annually to support local and state programs that prevent or reduce juvenile delinquency by improving systems, mobilizing resources, and engaging in advocacy to improve the lives of youth and families in the state,” said retired Judge F. Lee Forrester, JJDP Committee Chair.“The Stationhouse Adjustment Support Initiative is a perfect example of how the funds awarded by the JJDP Committee can help local jurisdictions support their youth and strengthen their communities.”

The programs receiving funding include:

  • Prevention Education, Inc. – $25,581. Prevention Education, Inc. (PEI Kids) will partner with the Lawrence Township Police Department to offer a diversion program for youth between the ages of 10 and 17 who have committed minor offenses in Lawrence Township and the surrounding Trenton-area community. Participants identified by the police department are referred to PEI Kids and participate in weekly sessions held at the Lawrence Community Center. Participants are required to participate for six consecutive weeks and complete a total 12 hours of curriculum time. Sessions address gang involvement, anger management, and substance abuse using the evidence-based Phoenix/New Freedom curriculum, which has demonstrated significant reductions in recidivism. Participants are also introduced to various community service opportunities, such as working in the community garden, and are required to complete 10 hours of service before completing the program.
  • Township of Bloomfield Police Department – $3,964. The Bloomfield Police Department (BPD) has incorporated its Junior Police Academy (JPA) into its existing Stationhouse Adjustment structure, allowing identified youth to participate in a key component of the BPD’s community policing efforts. This expansion of the Academy program allows approximately 40 first-time juvenile offenders to experience what is required to become a police officer. In addition, the curriculum includes sessions on gang awareness, the K9 Unit, crime scene investigation, self- defense, active shooter training, a SWAT demonstration, and Drill & Ceremony instruction.
  • Camden County Police Department – $50,000. Through the County’s Multi-Agency Lifeline (MALL), participants attend 48 classes held at the Salvation Army Kroc Center over a three-month period. The program consists of two Project Guardian events, which provide key relationship-building opportunities between participants and police officers. Youth are counseled on restorative diversion through the Center for Family Services (CFS) crisis intervention unit. CFS and the Camden County Police Department have designated a counselor to work with participants of the SHA program. The curriculum also includes various group activities, community service projects, and presentations by motivational speakers.
  • Cherry Hill Police Department – $45,612. The Cherry Hill Police Department, in partnership with the Cherry Hill School District, Project Little Warriors, and Crush Your Excuses has enhanced and expanded the diversion and intervention services provided through its SHA program. The program focuses on restorative healing practices that incorporate the youth participants, family members, and positive peer youth and adults who support participants’ success and help further reduce negative behaviors. The program components include understanding consequences, behavior modification, positive activities, lifestyle choices and supports, and family engagement.
  • Edison Township Police Department – $39,900. The Edison Mentoring Children (E=MC) program offers a six-week program for approximately 10 to 15 Edison youth in each session, serving a total of approximately 50 participants. Activities take place at the Police Department, Edison High School, and Family Support of Middlesex County and include bonding activities aimed at creating relationships between the participants and mentors, and educational/mentorship lessons by officers and other community leaders.
  • Gloucester Township Police Department – $50,000. The Gloucester Township Police Department (GTPD) SHA program enrolls eligible youth into a counseling program developed by Gloucester Township Police called “Handshakes not Handcuffs”. Youth ages 13 to 17 attend the program one night a week for one and a half hours for six weeks called GT FOCUS. The counselor addresses a different topic each night. A separate program is designed for youth 12 and under that includes parents to discuss the actions which resulted in police involvement. As part of the initiative, participants also meet with the School Resource Officers (SROs) and tour the police department as part of the mentoring component. One-on-one counseling is offered free of charge as necessary. In addition, the GCPD has partnered with Center for Family Services to further assist families holistically.
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Bellmawr Man, Gloucester County Juvenile Among 21 Individuals Arrested & Charged With Sexually Exploiting Children Online in “Operation Screen Capture”

On August 26, 2020, Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal announced the arrests of 21 individuals who are charged with sexually exploiting children online.

The 19 men, one woman, and one juvenile male were arrested in “Operation Screen Capture,” a collaborative operation launched in response to a dramatic increase in reports of potential threats to children from online predators during the COVID pandemic.

Three defendants – two men and one woman – are charged with sexually assaulting or attempting to sexually assault children. Eighteen are charged with endangering the welfare of children for possession and/or distribution of child sexual abuse materials, including, in many cases, child rape videos.

Photo credit: New Jersey Attorney General

The 21 defendants arrested in “Operation Screen Capture” were charged as follows:

  1. Aaron Craiger, 34, of Oklahoma. Gas station attendant.Arrested March 18.Two Counts of Attempted Aggravated Sexual Assault (2nd degree), Distribution of Child Pornography (2nd degree), Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree), Two Counts of Endangering the Welfare of a Child (3rd degree), Two Counts of Attempted Distribution of Marijuana (4th degree), Possession of Marijuana (Disorderly Persons Offense).
  2. Jason Berry, 40, of Keansburg, N.J. Unemployed.Arrested June 18.Manufacturing Child Pornography (1st degree), Sexual Assault (2nd degree), Child Abuse (2nd degree), Distribution of Child Pornography (2nd degree), Theft by Extortion (2nd degree), Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  3. Alize Tejada, 21, of Newark, N.J. Babysitter.Arrested July 15.Aggravated Sexual Assault (1st degree), Manufacturing Child Pornography (1st degree).
  4. Michael Gilpin, 42, of Union Beach, N.J. Pipe fitter.Arrested July 26.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  5. Raymond Radziewicz, 53, of Bloomfield, N.J. Former teaching assistant at child care center who was terminated as a result of this arrest.Arrested July 7.Distribution of Child Pornography (2nd degree), Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  6. Brett Warfield, 21, of Carney’s Point, N.J. Private security guard.Arrested July 15.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  7. Loic Atse, 18, of Aberdeen, N.J. College student.Arrested July 23.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  8. Donovan Falconer, 25, of Plainsboro, N.J. Employee of marketing firm.Arrested June 25.Distribution of Child Pornography (2nd degree), Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  9. Michael Ascough, 39, Pompton, N.J. Retail employee.Arrested July 5.Distribution of Child Pornography (2nd degree), Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  10. Joseph Benestante, 65, of Bergenfield, N.J. Retired.Arrested July 21.Distribution of Child Pornography (2nd degree).
  11. Shawn Daily, 45, of Browns Mills, N.J. Laborer.Arrested June 12.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  12. Roy Dantz, 71, of Mount Laurel, N.J. Retired.Arrested June 18.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  13. Christopher Crispino, 45, of Bellmawr, N.J. Unemployed.Arrested July 31.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  14. Dwayne McCormick, 25, of Orange, N.J. Unemployed.Arrested July 8.Distribution of Child Pornography (2nd degree), Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  15. Juvenile Male, 15, of Gloucester County, N.J. Unemployed.Arrested July 22.Distribution of Child Pornography (2nd degree), Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  16. Julian Ceballos, 31, of Hamilton (Mercer County), N.J. Restaurant worker.Arrested June 26.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  17. Timothy McMahon, 46, of Piscataway, N.J. Electrician.Arrested May 21.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  18. Edward Kross, 66, of Carteret, N.J. Part-time firefighting instructor.Arrested May 28.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  19. Henry Ziolkowski, 66, of Toms River, N.J. Surgery technician.Arrested July 10.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  20. Kevin Carrierri, 34, of Toms River, N.J. Chef.Arrested July 10.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).
  21. Matthew Marzullo, 20, of Hopatcong, N.J. Restaurant food server.Arrested July 1.Possession of Child Pornography (3rd degree).

Cyber tips to the New Jersey Regional Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force about potential threats to children online – including tips from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) – have increased up to 50 percent in New Jersey since the COVID emergency began in March, compared to the same time frame last year. Many cases in this operation stemmed from cyber tips from NCMEC, but others involved undercover chat investigations where perpetrators were attempting to meet children or other individuals online in order to sexually assault children.

Operation Screen Capture was led by the Division of Criminal Justice, New Jersey State Police, ICAC Task Force, U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office, Burlington County Prosecutor’s Office, Camden County Prosecutor’s Office, Essex County Prosecutor’s Office, Gloucester County Prosecutor’s Office, Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office, Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office, Ocean County Prosecutor’s Office, and Sussex County Prosecutor’s Office.The New Jersey State Parole Board assisted with arrests and search warrants.

The arrests, made between March 18 and July 31, 2020 include the following cases:

Aaron Craiger. Craiger, 34, of Oklahoma, a registered sex offender, was arrested on March 18 at a motel in Atlantic City after he allegedly traveled from Oklahoma to meet two men who offered him access to underage girls for sex. In reality, the defendant had communicated with undercover investigators from the New Jersey State Police and U.S. Homeland Security Investigations. One investigator pretended to offer his 12-year-old daughter for sex, and the other, his girlfriend’s 11-year-old daughter.Craiger, who had condoms with him when arrested, also allegedly possessed and distributed child sexual abuse materials.

Jason Berry. Berry, 40, of Keansburg, N.J., allegedly sexually exploited a 14-year-old girl he met on social media, manipulating her into sending him naked pictures of herself engaging in sexual acts. He allegedly had the girl carve his initials into her legs. He then tricked the girl into revealing her mother’s phone number and sent those images to her mother.

Alize Tejada. Tejada, 21, of Newark, N.J., allegedly sexually assaulted a very young child.She allegedly videotaped herself performing a sexual act on the child and posted the video on social media.

“Reports to our Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force of potential predatory conduct against children are up as much as 50 percent during the COVID emergency as homebound children, starved for outside contact, spend more time on their devices, and opportunistic sexual predators target them online,” said Attorney General Grewal. “We urge parents to be vigilant about the online activities of their children and warn children that the strangers they meet on popular social media sites, apps and gaming platforms may be out to harm them. We will continue to work overtime to arrest child predators and those who participate in the cruel exploitation of children by sharing child sexual abuse materials.”

In past cases, the ICAC Task Force has arrested child predators who used the following chat apps: Kik, Skout, Grindr, Whisper, Omegle, Tinder, Chat Avenue, Chat Roulette, Wishbone, Live.ly, Musical.ly, Paltalk, Yubo, Hot or Not, Down, and Tumblr.Arrests also have been made involving the gaming apps Fortnite, Minecraft, and Discord.Attorney General Grewal urged parents to familiarize themselves with these and other apps and warn their children about sharing information with strangers.

“As children return to virtual learning this fall, they will be spending even more time online, in many cases without any in-person teacher supervision or peer contact,” Attorney General Grewal added. “This may make them even more vulnerable. We want parents to be aware of the dangers— and, as we highlighted in a recent virtual town hall with the State Police and Department of Children and Families, we want everyone to know that there are resources to help children who are struggling with social isolation or who may be victims of trauma or abuse.”

“Operation Screen Capture is a great example of how law enforcement in New Jersey works together seamlessly through the ICAC Task Force to confront the threat of online predators, raise awareness among parents, and protect our children,” said Director Veronica Allende of the Division of Criminal Justice. “Whether we are running down tips from NCMEC or conducting undercover chats, we use our cyber expertise each day to apprehend those who use the internet to harm, abuse, and exploit children.”

“Our children are at an increased risk to fall victim to opportunistic online predators during this pandemic, as students have no choice but to turn to their devices to connect with friends and family and in many cases to prepare for remote learning,” said Colonel Patrick J. Callahan, Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police. “The State Police will continue to work with our law enforcement partners, and we will be unrelenting in our efforts to keep our children safe, but we cannot do it alone. We urge all parents and guardians to have conversations with your children about the dangers that exist on the internet and to closely monitor their online activity.”

“The internet has been instrumental in allowing our children to continue their educations remotely during this pandemic.However, it has also been used by the very worst among us to exploit them as well,” said Jason Molina, Special Agent in Charge, Homeland Security Investigations, Newark. “These various cases, which involve both teenagers and very young children, show the level of depravity of these predators.Some pursue physical contact initiated via online introductions, in some cases even crossing state lines, while others exclusively pursue these innocents online. In either case, the psychological damage to children is long lasting.In the face of that, only a very united effort of local, state, and federal law enforcement officials, along with the hypervigilant efforts of parents to monitor their children’s online activity, can be effective to stop them and bring them to justice.”

Bergen County Prosecutor Mark Musella said, “More and more, all of us look to the internet for remote connections because of work, school, or simply to surf the web, but this operation is a reminder that there are individuals who use the internet to traffic sexually explicit images and videos of children. We are proud to be part of this effort to identify, arrest, and aggressively prosecute those who are exploiting our children and our increased reliance on virtual connections by accessing and sharing illegal images and videos.”

“It cannot be emphasized strongly enough how important it is for parents to become educated about cyber threats, and take measures to protect their children from becoming victimized,” Burlington County Prosecutor Scott Coffina said. “Our way of life has been altered by this pandemic. It used to be that kids would play outside, and parents would check on them every so often to make sure they were safe. But the dangers they face have become much more direct now that they are spending a greater amount of time online than they ever have before. These threats are not readily visible, and effortlessly gain access to our homes, posing a very real risk to our children. We will continue to do everything legally allowable to find and punish those who are responsible.”

“It is a disturbing reality that predators are using the pandemic as an opportunity to target children as their online activity increases,” said Acting Camden County Prosecutor Jill Mayer. “This operation, and the resulting arrests, show that law enforcement agencies in New Jersey and the ICAC Task Force are working diligently together to identify, catch, and arrest these individuals.My message to anyone out there who is using the internet to target children— we are watching and you will be caught. Parents need to be mindful that as we enter a school year with remote learning, there will be predators online looking for potential victims. We encourage all parents to take this time to talk to their children about internet safety, even if you’ve had this discussion before. Keeping our children safe is something that can never be discussed too much.”

“Crimes against children are among the most disturbing, yet often the toughest to prosecute,” said Acting Essex County Prosecutor Theodore N. Stephens, II. “This joint effort underscores the willingness of law enforcement at all levels to work together to protect our most vulnerable from those who would use the internet and other means to prey upon children. In this age, when so many children are relying on computers for their education, entertainment and social life, we are committed to make the internet community as safe as possible.”

“The Gloucester County Prosecutor’s Office eagerly participated in this joint law enforcement effort focusing on individuals who felt our attention to their bad acts targeting vulnerable children was diverted,” said Acting Gloucester County Prosecutor Christine Hoffman. “To the contrary, we remain committed and vigilant, and never allow geography or jurisdictional boundaries to slow our collective efforts. We’ll continue to use every investigative tool available to identify, apprehend and convict those who prey on our children.”

“The Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office was proud to take part in Operation Screen Capture with our Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force partners,” said Mercer County Prosecutor Angelo J. Onofri. “The success of the operation highlights how important it is that parents and guardians know that these online predators are out there, especially as remote learning begins again and children spend more and more time on their screens. And it’s just as important that anyone who would use the internet as a tool to harm our kids knows that my office will continue to use every resource at its disposal to identify, investigate, and arrest you before you have the chance to do it.”

“The Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office welcomed the opportunity to participate in Operation Screen Capture as a member of the ICAC Task Force,” said Middlesex County Prosecutor Yolanda Ciccone. “This statewide investigation illustrates the fine work and collaboration of many law enforcement agencies in New Jersey. These agencies are dedicated to protecting our communities, especially our children. We thank all of the participating agencies.”

“Our relationship with ICAC has proved to be vital in protecting and safeguarding children from sexual predators,” said Ocean County Prosecutor Bradley D. Billhimer. “We will continue to collaborate with all of our law enforcement partners to do everything we can to root out those individuals that prey on our children. To that end, it is imperative for all parents to keep an eye on the online activities of their children.”

“The Sussex County Prosecutor’s Office was a proud participant in Operation Screen Capture,” said Sussex County Prosecutor Francis A. Koch. “This statewide operation demonstrates the dedicated collaboration of all law enforcement agencies in New Jersey to proactively protect all children. As important as today’s announcement of the arrests of these defendants is, the message to parents and children to be even more vigilant and guarded while online is equally important. Today, children are required to have an increased online presence that subjects them to predators looking to take advantage of them. We therefore ask all parents and guardians to take an even greater role in their children’s online activities. We in law enforcement pledge to continue to commit ourselves to do all we can to help protect all children and to root out the despicable predators preying on them.”

Craiger, Berry, and Tejada are being prosecuted by the Division of Criminal Justice.They were ordered detained in jail pending trial.The Division of Criminal Justice is also prosecuting six defendants charged with possessing and/or distributing child sexual abuse materials.The 12 other defendants are being prosecuted by the nine county prosecutors’ offices.

First-degree charges carry a sentence of 10 to 20 years in state prison and a fine of up to $200,000. Second-degree charges carry a sentence of five to 10 years in state prison and a fine of up to $150,000, while third-degree charges carry a sentence of three of five years in prison and a fine of up to $15,000. Fourth-degree charges carry a sentence of up to 18 months in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

The charges against the defendants are merely accusations and they are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

Attorney General Grewal thanked the attorneys, detectives, and staff in the Division of Criminal Justice Financial & Cyber Crimes Bureau who worked on this operation under the supervision of Bureau Chief Jillian Carpenter, Deputy Bureau Chief Lilianne Daniel, and DCJ Deputy Director Robert Czepiel.

He thanked ICAC Task Force Commander Lt. John Pizzuro of the New Jersey State Police ICAC Unit and the detectives of the ICAC Unit, as well as the New Jersey State Police TEAMS and K-9 Units.

Attorney General Grewal thanked U.S. Homeland Security Investigations, Newark and Cherry Hill, under the leadership of Special Agent in Charge Jason Molina and Assistant SAC Richard Reinhold.

He thanked the New Jersey State Parole Board, under the leadership of Chairman Samuel J. Plumeri Jr., for its valuable assistance with arrests and search warrants.

Finally, Attorney General Grewal thanked all of the prosecutors, detectives, investigators, and staff of the following county prosecutors’ offices, which participated as members of the ICAC Task Force:

  • Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Burlington County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Camden County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Essex County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Gloucester County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Ocean County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Sussex County Prosecutor’s Office